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by a cambridge electorate. at school, he was actually discouraged from pursuing a career in science. >> it was a completely ridiculous idea because there was no hope whatsoever of my doing science and then a time spent on it would be a total waste on my part and whoever had to teach me. but the nobel jury beg to differ. >> we now knew that -- know that development is not strictly a one-way street. >> there is hope that their work will pave the way for developing methods to diagnose and treat many diseases. >> to find out more about this, we are joined by our science correspondent. a lot of people around the world are working in stem cell research. why did these two get the prize? >> they got it for the same reason a lot of nobel prize laureates have gotten it -- they went against the currents. we used to believe that cell differentiation only went in one direction. you had these undifferentiated cells, stem cells, and then they became something in the course of development. in the embryo has a lot of them and they turn into bone, skin, liver. everyone thought it only went in one dir
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
. and a lot of bad news coming out of research by the australian institute of marine sciences that as you pointed out half of the coral in the great barrier reef has declined largely due to both tropical storms, a crown of thorns starfish that feeds on the coral up to 40% declined just from the starfish alone and of course climate change and coral bleaching. >> so storms, starfish, climate change. what can we do to stop the coral loss? >> well, this is some scary news. this is much more than anyone expected. but there is a little bit of a silver lining. we believe the crown of thorns starfish in their larva stages grow faster because of runoff and fertilizer off the coast of australia. so scientists are calling for vehicler controls on that runoff going into the reef which may help to reduce the population of the crown of thorns starfish and hopefully relieve some of the pressure. they believe up to 42% of the decline of the great barrier reef has been caused by extreme outbreaks of these crown of thorns starfish. so hopefully reducing runoff can have a positive impact and allow the reef
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "early start." an american astronaut about to hitch a ride with the russians up to the international space station. later this month, nasa's kevin ford will join two russian astronauts aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft that will blast them into orbit for a five-month stay. ford will join the station's current team and take over as expedition commander. this will mark for the second space flight and his first aboard a russian soyuz spacecraft. kevin ford is joining us live now from the cosmonaut training center in star city, russia, where he and his crewmates have been preparing for the mission. thank you for being with us. you will be at that time iss from the end of the month until march of next year. can you tell us what you will be doing while you are there? >> well, i can't tell you exactly what we will be doing but i can tell you what we plan to do. so we -- we hope to carry out a lot of science. we had a lot of trainin
will be developed by a school teacher? >> yes. there's an entire line of science toys, encouraging girls to get involved in science. there's journals, online, interactivity way to get kids hooked on science. >> reporter: this comes from the d.c. area. word around. >> this is a travel game you can take with you. for older kids and adults. moves quick. it's a lot of fun. >> reporter: now let's talk about younger kids. >> this is an active game. based on disney fairies. you put them around the house. girls will pull one of these out of the bag. when you get to fairy, you run around the house and try to grab as many as you can. they're up and active. this is green toys, made of 100% recycled plastic. it's waterproof so kids can take it in the bath. not only can you control the car, you can play music now. i have all my songs downloaded on itunes. then i can open up the doors of the car and the car becomes a speaker. >> reporter: blue tooth from the device to the vehicle? >> yeah. you can drive it, may your music and it's kind of fun. >> reporter: really by moving the ipad around will steer the car.
with the right skills here at home. nevada, i wanted, recruit thousands of new math and science teachers, improve early education, create 2 million more slots in community colleges so that workers can get trained for the new jobs out there now. help us work with colleges and universities to keep tuition down. that is a goal we can meet together. you cannot choose that future for america -- can choose that future for america, but what we need to do? >> vote. >> i have already worked with republicans and democrats to cut spending by $1 trillion. i'm willing to do a little bit more. i want to reform our tax code so that idea is simple and fair. but i also want to ask the wealthiest households in america to pay slightly higher taxes. that is the same rate we had when bill clinton was president and we created 23 million new jobs, the biggest surplus in history, and a whole lot of millionaires to boot. [applause] so that is my plan. in fairness, my opponent has got a plan, too. there's only one problem. some of you heard bill clinton say that there is no or arithmetic in it. [laughter] they think that
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ç it's just common sense. you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier highways. on once empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. connell: what are you looking at? dagen: don't look at me. connell: what a start. hey everybody. quarter past the hour. time to go to nicole for stock us now as we do every 15 minutes. did you hear american express is teaming up with wal-mart? nicole: i heard a little something about that connell. let's check it out. let's see how the stocks are faring rite now. -- right now. you can see how they are doing on a day where the dow has been to the down side. this is new news for wal-mart. they are launching the blue bird. it is basi
that the president's agenda of investment in education, more math and science teachers, help for manufacturing in the u.s., reducing oil dependency and balance much trade deficit. melissa: all you've done is talking points. you haven't answer ad single question. we're out of time. could you anticipates one of the questions. >> melissa, here is the facts. the facts are, more people are going back to work. the unemployment rate is 7.8%. this is looking very much like 1984 and ronald reagan. unemployment down, people back to work. melissa: thanks for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. melissa: so there is big divide in the jobs data today, as we're discussing household survey shows total employment surged 873,000, but payroll says only 114,000 people went back to work. even jack welch said it, hard to reconcile these numbers. he tweeted, unbelievable jobs numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. can't debate so they change the numbers. that is harsh criticism. here with me is economist peter morici. which also have gary burtless, senior fellow? [no audio. what do yo
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
have the most government-funded research. we push the balance on science and technology, so our best innovators are here. in education, we now, well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to ld the world in college graduates. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers, we are now $2 trillion in deficits in terms of infrastructure. a great education, and get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on each one of these issues that are so vital to our greatest strength. i don't think we can remedy this . and on budget-funded research, it looks wike an e.k.g. heading for a heart attack. in terms of the things that have historically made us great on each one of those indices, i see us not going in the direction we should be going. for me that's the alarm bell and the wake-up call. >> are we as strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see measurable? >> it is on obvious we are not as strong as we have ever been. but also because the world was changed around us. we spent an awful lot of time, eff
at a typewriter or a scientist thinking hard but what about having the science? and for him as a composer it was exciting because he wanted his music to evolve knowing about this. it represent this is extra dimension. so he does electronic music to have something that parallels that. for me i tried to explain all these complicated threads that led us to where we were today and the idea of having these many different voices, the voices of people and the visuals i realized what a rich forum opera is. we think of it as in the past but it's such a rich way to convey the sense of an idea, what's going on spchlt and the idea that it was going to premier at the pompidou center made it that much more attractive. >> are there similarities and scientific creativity and artistic creative any >> you know, there really are in many ways and i'm always intrigued by how a t of the good people in the arts are problem solvers the same way they're problem solvers, they're trying to get from one point to another and they're trying to find the route to do it. in fact, a work together with an artist on an art
in things like education, making sure that we are continuing to invest in basic science and research. >> guys, he was flat in the performance why? >> no teleprompter. really in >> absolutely. >> why else, tell me . >> no passion. >> explain that. >> he didn't have enthusiasm for what he was talking about and he didn't feel strongly. >> you guys agree with that? >> yes. >> he is contemplating a bit. he has his record that he can't talk about. >> he couldn't defend his record and he couldn't get near his record. so how could he defend it? >> why do you say that. >> romney had facts and statistics and obama had generalities of helping people and feeling good, but not the tools to implement what had to be done. >> i mean, romney didn't have that man facts but obama did. i will give you obama is tired and he's president and it is a rough time and he knows he's president. and he aged 10-20 years and he's doing. and give you a little lack of energy, when he's out there. >> all rightt for the record, ken. you have more energy that barack obama. now we are coming back to you a little laterr o
dragon contains 1,000 pounds of food, clothing equipment, science experiments including 23 designed and built by students. the cargo includes a freezer that can store laboratory samples at temperatures as low as 300 degrees below zero. the supplies are scheduled to reach the space station on wednesday. the capsule will remain docked for a few weeks. the a second company, orbital sciences of virginia is preparing a rocket for test flight later this year. exciting future ahead for private space travel. jon: great stuff. julie banderas, thanks. >> reporter: sure. jenna: early voting is underway in ohio right now, a key swing state. already there are issues which may not be decided until just before the election. in fact several lawsuits are before the courts now and how those cases turn out may impact the outcome of the presidential election. mike tobin is live in chicago with more on this. mike, what's this battle over early voting all about? >> reporter: jenna, we've got a lot of people watching the ohio state, secretary of state's office today because the secretary of state, john hu
with other cargo ships from russia, japan or -- they're going to put in science experiments, gear that maybe they could repair, or stuff that they want to send back down to friends or family, and that's going to come back down on october 28th, splash down into the pacific, spacex folks will pluck it out of the ocean and deliver the cargo back to nasa. it is first of its kind in unma bringing back more. i'm sure they're excited to get some chocolate vanilla swirl. >> ice cream aside, it is significant, they're able to bring cargo, this is the beginning of what i'm sure they hope will be an ability to ferry astronauts. chad and i covered the final retirement of the "atlantis," how long before the private entities are able to send astronauts so we don't have to rely on the soyuz. >> spacex planned to use this unmanned dragon spacecraft, to scale it up into a seven-person spaceship, that was their primary goal while they were building it. they always said and said last night that in three years they expect to be ready to fly humans on a version of this spacecraft. they are one of four companies
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>and now to my point. that is a whole bunch of bunk! the powerful my steal an election but they cannot steal democracy. bloc [♪ theme music ♪] >> announcer: ladies and gentlemen, it's a the "stephanie miller show"! ♪ i'm walking on sunshine, woe ho ♪ ♪ i'm walking on sunshine, woe ho ♪ ♪ it's time to feel good, hey all right now. it's time to feel good. >> stephanie: yaw hoo, it is the "stephanie miller show." wow, check me out. look at this. >> what. >> stephanie: the former white house director of foreign affairs -- >> that sounds fancy. >> stephanie: right. >> to talk about mitt romney's foreign policy speech. [ wah wah ] . >> yeah. >> stephanie: it probably would have been devastating if any of it were true. that sounds bad. the president signed no foreign trade agreements at all? wow, that sounds horrible. >> except for the ones he did sign. [ bell chimes ] [ applause ] >> stephanie: and the other areas where his policy is exactly the cam
things like this. really what they're saying is this is going to advance science. this is going to enable them to develop the next generation of space suit. the next generation of high pressure suit. the gentleman whose record is he going to break, joe kitinger, he did this 52 years ago, and they base the space suits for the apollo and mercury missions on his space suit, on his high pressure suit. with the suit that felix is using, if it's going to work, they'r going to be able to develop other space missions with astronauts wearing a very similar kind of suit. >> he really is fearless. we wish him all the best. thank you, brian. we'll be watching. sxwlirchlgts poll numbers have dropped after the debate last week. we'll look at how these numbers break down in the swing states, and don't forget, can you watch cnn live on your computer while you're at work at cnn.com/26. an. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two year
. on the other hand, rocket science is hard, and this is only the fourth launch of the falcon 9, spaceand should use this as a learning opportunity to strengthen the design of their vehicle. jon: well, it's actually a picture-perfect launch except for that, except for that explosion. you think that they will learn from it, they'll, you know, figure out whatever the problem was and the space program, the international space station supply program will continue on as intended? >> well, there are two people at nasa, the head of the human space flight division and the space station program, they have to both approve the results coming out of spacex to insure that they understand this failure, they put a corrective fix in, and they'll bless this fix. and if nasa's not satisfied, of course, they'll go back to the drawing boards until the test program shows it's safe to fly again. jon: tom jones, former astronaut for nasa, thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure, jon. jenna: doing what cheerleaders do best. jon: what? jenna: one of the things. the incredible video of a texas teen on a flipping frenzy
100,000 math and science teachers, focus on early childhood education, provide job training for 2 million workers at community colleges, cut the growth of tuition costs in half, so you guys are not loaded up with that when you graduate. -- debt when you graduate. that is something we can do. i do not just talk the talk. i walk the block. -- walk the walk. under the student loan program, we cut out the middleman and gave the money directly to students. across the country, here we are getting better deals on programs, keeping rates low -- on pell grants, keeping rates low. we can meet these goals together. you can choose a better future for america. i want to use the money we are saving for ending the war is in iraq and afghanistan and use that to pay down our debt, but also put people to work rebuilding our roads and our bridges. governor romney said it was tragic to end the war in iraq. i disagree. i think bringing our troops home to their families was the right thing to do. if he had gotten his way, those troops would still be there. in his speech yesterday, he double down on tha
dwet into it, how do you judge the brand science. >> you look at the proportion of the earnings to the brand. put a number on how important is this brand to the economic power of the company. >> i'm saying now revealing it, why is coke number one and not apple? >> coca-cola, i mean, one thing about brands is that they are not just a measure of what's going on now. they are a view into the future as well. the thing about coca-cola that you can't deny, 100-year-plus history of consistently delivering great product and relevant brand to people. apple -- as far as apple is concerned, we know they're doing great right now, but there's concerns about what might happen in the near future with the loss of steve jobs. >> i understand why you're so focused on brands, because brands is what you do. you advertise companies. they pay you money to make their brand bigger. actually in a world in which we're connecting over the internet where i care if my coffee maker is purchasable on amazon rather than the brand of that coffee maker is what you do for a living becomes less relevant? >> i'd sa
to push the boundaries of science and technology so are innovators and entrepreneurs can start these companies. to think about that as a form of success, in education, roughly 30% of high-school students drop out. we used to leave the world in high school graduates. we no longer. on infrastructure, we are $2 trillion in the deficit in terms of the infrastructure. on immigration, we have a policy where we give you a great education and then get the hell out. 1b're still fighting simple h visa issues. i do not think we have in any way remedied this. on government-funded research, it looks like any cagy headed to -- ekg heading to a heart attack. on each one of those indices that has made as great, i see is not going in the direction that we should be. for me, that is the alarm bell and the peptalk have been trying to put forth. >> i will ask the same question to you. are we a strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see a measurable in meaningful decline? >> to me, it's obvious we're not as strong as we have ever been for the reasons that tom has just enumerated but also
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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